An Introduction to ‘Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light’

Here’s the first of three short films produced for The National Gallery in London to support their current exhibition, ‘Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light’.

As you’ll see from previous posts, the project involved filming in New York and across Spain at numerous locations including Madrid at the Museo Sorolla and Museo del Prado, the artist’s hometown of Valencia and in Granada and Seville.

Some of the interviews were conducted in our studio near Kings’ Cross in London.

The project involved a lot of different skills. Shot on Sony FS7 it also incorporates dolly shots, drone filming of the Spanish coast and electronic slider shots of some of Sorolla’s paintings.

Sorrola’s Grave, Valencia

We were honoured to be allowed to film at the grave of Joaquin Sorolla in Valencia with the kind permission of his family and the assistance of the Ayuntamiento de Valencia and the Valencia film Office.

Using our Dana Dolly we were able to capture beautiful tracking shots while keeping our footprint to an absolute minimum.

Filming at the Museo del Prado, Madrid

Sometimes we really have to pinch ourselves. As part of our ongoing filming for The National Gallery’s Sorolla exhibition, we were lucky enough to film at one of the World’s most famous galleries, the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

We were also fortunate enough to be allowed to setup in the Velazquez room right opposite his masterpiece Las Meninas. We were there to interview Javier Barón Thaidigsmann, Director of 19th Century Paintings at the Prado and a renowned expert on Sorolla.

Madrid for The National Gallery’s Sorolla Exhibition Film

This March, The National Gallery will host ‘Sorolla: Spanish Master of Light’,  the first UK exhibition of Spain’s Impressionist, Sorolla, in over a century.

Known as the ‘master of light’ for his iridescent canvases, this is a rare opportunity to see the most complete exhibition of Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida’s (1863–1923) paintings outside Spain.

From the vivid seascapes, garden views, and bather scenes for which he is most renowned, to portraits, landscapes and genre scenes of Spanish life, the exhibition features more than 60 works spanning Sorolla’s career – many of which are travelling from private collections and from afar.

NextShoot have been commissioned to produce a film to support the exhibition, detailing Sorolla’s life and times and some of his most notable works. This involves filming in Spain and America at numerous institutions and locations which were central to Sorolla’s work.

We started in Madrid, at Sorolla’s former house, which is now home to Museo Sorolla. As well as an incredible collection of his paintings, the museum also has a vast archive of photographs, letters and personal possessions.

The National Gallery Courtauld Impressionists

We’ve worked with The National Gallery in London over the last few years on various projects and were delighted to be asked back to film a series of short films for this Autumn’s blockbuster show ‘Courtauld Impressionists’ featuring works by Manet, Renoir, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Gauguin and many more.

For the first time in London for 70 years the National Gallery displays major Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterworks from the Courtauld Gallery, purchased in the 1920s by Samuel Courtauld (1876-1947). These will be shown alongside paintings from the National Gallery’s own collection which the businessman and philanthropist financed and helped acquire.

Building the London Mastaba

Christo’s monumental artwork The Mastaba graced the Serpentine in Hyde Park for the duration of the summer and certainly brought some colour and some debate to this idyllic corner of London.

We were filming the progress of the construction and were lucky to be there atop the sculpture as the last barrel went in. We won’t pretend there wasn’t some trepidation either in climbing up through the labyrinth of scaffolding that formed the structure’s interior, or tiptoeing across the welding joins on the barrels. The view, however, was splendid.